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Personal Stories / Re: Out of my mind driven to drink
« Last post by redheadedguy on November 27, 2021, 11:04:39 pm »
Thanks for sharing, Iíve had a similar experience. I wish more people would post here.
2
General Discussion / seo consulting Los Angeles
« Last post by Dimond35 on May 22, 2019, 04:51:11 am »
The best way to improve your sales is to get connected with the potential customers. If you truly want to gain best outcome then social media marketing and search engine optimization are two of the best technique that are affordable as well. I am also using seo consulting Los Angeles services for my business.
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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5329641/Bristol-student-dead-9th-life-2016.html

Student, 21, found dead in woods is NINTH studying in Bristol to take their own life in just 18 months
Raven Hunt, 21, was found dead in woodland after struggling with depression
The third-year student was diagnosed while preparing for her GCSE exams
Her death is the ninth student suicide in Bristol in just 18 months
Raven's devastated family have accused officials of trying to 'cover up' the death
By Scott Campbell For Mailonline

PUBLISHED: 12:14, 30 January 2018 | UPDATED: 14:02, 30 January 2018

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The family of Raven Hunt (pictured), 21, say she was found dead in woodland after struggling with withdrawal symptoms from taking an anti-depressant   +3
The family of Raven Hunt (pictured), 21, say she was found dead in woodland after struggling with withdrawal symptoms from taking an anti-depressant

A family has slammed a university and claimed authorities tried to 'cover up' their daughter's death after she took her own life - the ninth in the city in just 18 months.

The family of Raven Hunt, 21, say she was found dead in woodland after struggling with withdrawal symptoms from taking an anti-depressant.

They have criticised the University of the West of England in Bristol, where Raven studied sociology, for failing to contact them following her death last April.

The third-year student was initially diagnosed with anxiety and depression while preparing for her GCSE exams.

Doctors prescribed her anti-depressants and her mood fluctuated throughout the next few years, the family say.

She then started taking an anti-depressant eight weeks before her death after being given the drug by another student to cope with her anxiety issues ahead of her final exams.

Emmy had just broken up with her boyfriend two weeks before her death, was drinking excessive amounts of alcohol and decided to come off the drug.

Her family say she suffered anxiety as a result and took her own life.

She was one of nine university students from Bristol to take their life in 18 months - seven from Bristol University and two from UWE.

The family say no one from her university went to the inquest and they had no contact from anyone at UWE.

UWE have admitted they failed to keep proper contact records for not getting in touch sooner.

But the family say their lack of contact amounts to a lack of care from the uni which could have put other vulnerable students at risk.

Raven's heartbroken granddad, Richard, says he did not hear from UWE until he emailed the vice-chancellor Steve West after her inquest in July

Doctors prescribed Raven, pictured ,anti-depressants and her mood fluctuated throughout the next few years, the family say   +3
Doctors prescribed Raven, pictured ,anti-depressants and her mood fluctuated throughout the next few years, the family say

The university said it decided not to send anyone to the inquest as it was not their 'normal practice'.

Her mum Emmy said: 'I feel the university are trying to cover up. I feel like that anyway, even when I take myself out of the emotion of losing my daughter.

'It would have been a lot longer [for them to get in contact] if we didn't get in touch with them first. We would probably still be waiting now.

'When they don't help or don't contact us, or do anything to support the case, to me it's a cover up.

'Not just for my child, but for other children who have passed away. Pastoral care is zero, that's how I see it. How many more children have died?

'She enjoyed her time in Bristol, and wanted to stay there after university and work with children. She was very passionate about it.

'I don't know why she would throw it away.'

Richard added: 'I think they are incompetent. We've had no letter of condolence, nothing from the university until I emailed them.'

The family has spoken out for the first time after learning about the death of Justin Cheng on January 12, a Bristol University student who also took his own life.

Ged Flynn, chief executive of charity Papyrus, a UK charity dedicated to the prevention of young suicide, said the university's lack of action could have put the lives of Raven's family and friends at risk.

Raven (pictured) is the ninth student from Bristol's universities - seven at Bristol University and two at UWE - who took their own lives in an 18 months period   +3
Raven (pictured) is the ninth student from Bristol's universities - seven at Bristol University and two at UWE - who took their own lives in an 18 months period

Emmy - who brought up her four children single-handedly - knew something was wrong when Raven did not reply to a message on April 12.

Emmy got in contact with her daughter's friends and they launched a search for her. A dog walker found her hanged in Leigh Woods at around 1.45pm on April 13.

Raven was given a card with the Samaritans helpline number by her doctor but took her life before treatment could begin.

A day after Raven's birthday - and three months after she died - Richard decided to write to the vice-chancellor.

He had tried ringing the university twice before to get help but was brushed off with excuses that their systems were 'frozen' or that someone would get back to them.

Richard said: 'To me, it seems the dots aren't joined up inside the university. They don't have the systems or processes to deal with these things.

'It's difficult to say what's wrong. The fact we had to drive everything is evidence they are not up to job of looking after the students in their care.'

Mr Flynn of Papyrus said those most at risk after a suicide were those closest to the deceased.

He said: 'The public needs to understand the difference of talking about suicide and talking about methods.

'It's unacceptable for the university not to follow up with support. We engage in campaigns for better support for those who survive and are left behind.

'My message to all universities when this happens is to gather together and get your act together and conduct a safe and open discussion without romanticising suicide. Let the university wake up and smell the coffee.

'Suicide is the leading cause of death among young people. You have got to talk about it.

'The fact is that those who have been bereaved by suicide are at heightened risk of suicide as well. They will need that support.'

Professor Steve West, vice-chancellor at UWE, is also chairman of Universities UK Working Group on Mental Health in Higher Education.

He said: 'We are extremely sorry to learn the family were disappointed by the level of contact from the university following Raven's death.

'Despite systems being in place to facilitate emergency contacts for students, if contact details are not regularly updated issues can arise.

'An internal review concluded that while the university went to great lengths to establish contact with close relatives to offer our sympathies and support, complications arose and we failed to meet the required standards.

'As a result, changes have been made to our internal processes and these have been shared with the family.

'We have also offered our support to the family in their proposal to honour Raven's memory and raise awareness of the risks associated with drugs.

'Regarding antidepressant use highlighted by the family, an investigation into allegations has been carried out by the university in conjunction with police.'

Raven's devastated mum Emmy paid tribute to her 'caring and loving' daughter.

Emmy, from Southampton, said: 'Raven was caring and loving. We called her the Golden Child - I could count on one hand how many times I've had to tell her off.

'She was very fiercely protective of her family, and knew what she wanted to do with her life. She was close to her friends, she was such a likeable and loveable person.

'I brought my kids up not to judge anyone and Raven had friends from all walks of life.

'It's hard, but so many people tell me stories of her and how much they loved her.

'She was very bossy when she was growing up. When she was 15, she was at the birth of her youngest sister.

'She wanted to be there because she was so into midwifery. She was so amazing, she absolutely adored her siblings.'

Speaking of her heartache, she added: 'I don't sleep, I don't eat, I'm on anti-depressants and I get panic attacks. It's been really bad.

'I'm just trying to keep the kids together. I block it out, like it's not happening, but that is no way of dealing with it.

'I lost another child as a baby but - I'm not saying that wasn't hard - but this is different.

'I will never get over it or accept it, but I will have to learn to live with it. It's still so raw, she meant the world to me.'

Who are the nine students who have taken their own lives in Bristol?
Raven is the ninth student from Bristol's universities - seven at Bristol University and two at UWE - who took their own lives in an 18 months period.

First year student Daniel Green, 18, 'took his life' and was found hanging in his room at Goldney Hall on October 21, 2016.

In the narrative conclusion, a coroner said: 'Daniel James Green took his own life but the question of intent is inconclusive.'

Kim Long, pictured, an 18-year-old law student died of asphyxiation at his halls of residence on November 10
Lara Nosiru, 23, pictured, a final-year neuroscience student was found dead in the Avon Gorge on January 30, 2017
Kim Long, pictured left, an 18-year-old law student died of asphyxiation at his halls of residence on November 10. Lara Nosiru, 23, pictured right, a final-year neuroscience student was found dead in the Avon Gorge on January 30, 2017

Philosophy student Miranda Williams, 19, suffered paracetamol poisoning on October 10, and died three days later in hospital.

Kim Long, an 18-year-old law student died of asphyxiation at his halls of residence on November 10, and an inquest concluded he took his own life.

Lara Nosiru, 23, a final-year neuroscience student was found dead in the Avon Gorge on January 30, 2017.

Third year Elsa Scaburri, 21, pictured, was found hanged in a barn at a farm near her home near Salisbury on March 3 2017, an inquest heard
First-year student Sam Symons, 19, pictured, was found in his room at a halls of residence
Third year Elsa Scaburri, 21, pictured left, was found hanged in a barn at a farm near her home near Salisbury on March 3 2017, an inquest heard. First-year student Sam Symons, 19, pictured right, was found in his room at a halls of residence

A coroner concluded 'she took her own life whilst under the influence of drugs'.

Third year Elsa Scaburri, 21, was found hanged in a barn at a farm near her home near Salisbury on March 3 2017, after taking her own life, an inquest heard.

First-year student Sam Symons, 19, was studying law at the University of the West of England (UWE), also in Bristol, and was found in his room at a halls of residence.

James Thomson, 20, pictured, a second-year maths student, took his own life on October 25, 2017
Philosophy student Miranda Williams, 19, pictured, suffered paracetamol poisoning on October 10, and died three days later in hospital
James Thomson, 20, pictured left, a second-year maths student, took his own life on October 25, 2017. Philosophy student Miranda Williams, 19, pictured right, suffered paracetamol poisoning on October 10, and died three days later in hospital

He died during the night of Sunday, April 30, or in the early hours of Monday, May 1, and an inquest concluded suicide.

James Thomson, 20, a second-year maths student, took his own life on October 25, 2017. He hanged himself at the home he shared with uni friends.

 

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Help & advice
Do you...

Feel too embarrassed to take friends home?
Feel confused when your mum or dad change when they drink?
Feel nobody really cares what happens to you?
Feel guilty and donít know why?
Feel different from other children?
Keep secrets about problems in your family?
Tell lies to cover up for someoneís drinking?
Believe no one could possibly understand how you feel?
You are not alone. Many families keep alcohol problems a secret, so sometimes it can feel like you are the only one. 1 in 5 children in the UK live with a parent who drinks too much. This means other people you know at school, clubs etc. may have similar problems, and may be trying to hide it.

If your parent, step-parent, grandparent, carer or anyone else important to you drinks too much, it can affect you, even if you are not living in the same house. A child of an alcoholic can be 1 or 101 Ė it doesn't change the fact that your parent drinks too much, and the problems this brings.

Alcoholism is like an illness, where the person has lost control over their drinking and usually needs help to stop. There is help and you can feel better if your parent continues to drink or not.

If you are a child affected by your mum or dadís drinking, we hope this page will help.

You are not alone
Nacoa is here to help. Watch the music video for our single ďA change is gonna comeĒ, which shows there are many children like you.


Things to remember
You are not responsible for your mum or dadís drinking
You canít control someone elseís drinking. Pouring away, watering down or hiding alcohol may make things worse, and the person drinking may become angry or secretive.

Alcohol affects the brain
Alcohol can make people forget things. They often donít remember silly, embarrassing or other things they do when drunk. Try not to argue with your mum or dad when they are drinking; it may make things worse; they may say things they normally wouldnít and may not remember the conversation later.

Itís not your fault
When someone has an alcohol problem, drinking becomes so important that they may upset people they love. Promises are often made but not always kept. Children may feel let down or forgotten.

Your mum or dad can only stop drinking when they are ready. There is help, but they have to accept that they have a problem and want to stop. Remember, your mum or dadís drinking is never your fault.

The six Cs
I didnít cause it
I canít cure it
I canít control it
I can take care of myself
I can communicate my feelings
I can make healthy choices
Ways to feel better
Talk to someone you trust
Talk about how you are feeling to a friend, relative, teacher or Nacoa. This is not telling on your family and it can make you feel less alone. At Nacoa we understand what it can be like when a parent drinks too much. We will listen and we wonít judge; you can trust us.

Find out more about alcohol and the effects on the family
Understanding how alcohol affects everyone in the family may help you to see things more clearly and help you to feel better. To find out more, see Information. You can also look at questions other children have asked in FAQs.

Spend time doing things you enjoy
Find time for things that you like. It maybe sport or hobbies, playing in your room or in the garden, reading a book or watching TV, or going to a friendís. Perhaps join an after-school, youth or sports club, or a Scout or Girl Guide group. Sometimes worries can take over, and taking a break (even if just for a short while) can help. You are important too.

Understand that your feelings are normal
Itís OK to hate the problems drinking can cause, yet love the person who is drinking. Alcohol problems in the family can result in a lot of confusing and upsetting feelings. Talking and writing about your feelings can help. Some people like to keep a diary, write poems, or draw and paint.

Read other childrenís stories
Reading the stories of other children who have a mum or dad that drinks too much can help you to know you are not alone. To read these stories, see our Children Experiences section.

Look at books about the problem
For books that may be helpful, see our Books section. Some of these books may be available at your local library.

Talk to Nacoa
At Nacoa, we understand what itís like when a parent drinks too much. Our helpline is free and confidential. We wonít judge and we are here to help. Sometimes just talking or writing to someone helps.

When you call or email, you can tell us as little or as much as you want. Your calls or emails can be long or short and you can contact us as often as you want. You donít even need to tell anyone else youíve talked to us. For more information about contacting the helpline and our Nacoa Promise see helpline in our about section.

Ways to stay safe
Sometimes, when mums or dads drink they can change and hurt themselves and people around them. Call Nacoa and we can help you to make a plan just in case you get scared. It does not have to be about the drink problem but anything which frightens you. Making a plan means you will have all the things you need to stop feeling scared when you need it most.

Some children feel safe in their bedroom, or with their brothers and sisters, some children feel safe with someone they trust, like a grandparent or neighbour.
You could make lists of places where you feel safe and friends and family you trust with their telephone numbers so you have everything you need to keep safe and separate from the problems at home. You may like to print out and fill in this Important Numbers card to keep in your pencil case, wallet or bag.
If you are frightened at any time, contact Nacoa and we can help you to find a safe place or phone ChildLine on 0800 1111 and ask for help. The Police and Ambulance Service are also here to help and want you to be safe. You can call 999. They may put you in touch with someone from the Family Support Unit who knows what itís like living with people who drink too much.
Even if you have other people Ė like Social Workers Ė in your life you can continue to contact Nacoa. Nacoa is here for life. You can call as often as you want, even if you just want to talk to someone so you are not alone.

Coping with the death of a parent
Sadly, sometimes when people have alcohol problems, it can lead to them dying. This is scary for everyone and can bring up lots of difficult feelings. If this has happened to you, you may also find it helpful to talk to someone like Nacoa and to read our Coping with the Death of a Parent information sheet.

Other sources of support
Remember Nacoa is always here for you. Here are some other places that you can also get help.

ChildLine

Helpline: 0800 1111

24-hour helpline and website providing support for young people around a range of issues.

COAP (Children of Addicted Parents)

Online forum for young people affected by a parentís addiction.

Young carers projects

Support groups and activities for children who help look after other members of their family, because of alcohol or drug use or other health problems.

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5
Media Stories / National-Helpline-For-Children-Of-Alcoholics
« Last post by zebb on December 31, 2017, 05:13:12 pm »
https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/national-helpline-for-children-of-alcoholics-ntzj77hsl

A national helpline for the children of alcoholics will be set up after the health secretary Jeremy Hunt was moved to act by hearing his Labour shadow describe his upbringing as the child of an alcoholic father.

In a rare example of cross-party co-operation on the NHS, Hunt announced that he was drawing up a strategy to support the 200,000 children being raised by alcoholic parents.

He stepped in after Jonathan Ashworth, the shadow health secretary, spoke about his experiences last weekend, including in The Sunday Times.

Under plans unveiled today, £500,000 will be used to expand an existing local helpline and MPs from an all-party group will devise a support plan. Children of alcoholics are twice as likely to have problems at school and three times as likely to consider suicide.

ďI pay tribute to the extraordinary bravery of people like Jon Ashworth who have spoken out about this issue with such honesty and passion.Ē Hunt said.

ďThis issue transcends party politics and I am committed to working with Jon, the parliamentary group and charities to deliver a plan that helps change the story for these young people.Ē

Ashworth said: ďI am delighted that Jeremy Hunt has agreed to fund a national helpline so the children of alcoholics need not suffer in silence.Ē
6
Children Family Support / "COA" Child of an Alcoholic
« Last post by zebb on December 31, 2017, 05:09:00 pm »
7
Media Stories / Re: Tiger Woods Arrest Highlights The Dangers Of Drugged Driving
« Last post by Dimond35 on November 08, 2017, 04:00:22 am »
Thatís good if he is really educating people, as many times they are always caught on wrong end of the law. My cousin has been working with a top DUI lawyer and have seen many instances where influential and rich people go scot free.
9
Media Stories / Re: Understanding Paxil, Alcohol, and Abuse
« Last post by Domena42 on October 27, 2017, 01:51:24 am »
Was looking for a reputed rehab center for my opiate addiction and then came to know about virginia opiate addiction treatment center and went there for treatment. They gave beneficial treatment that too on affordable price. Really appreciate their work.
10
Website's / Mad In The UK
« Last post by zebb on August 07, 2017, 12:51:21 pm »
Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 5

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